Tree Page 6 F - G

Identification by Leaf, Bark, Flower & Fruit of Rainforest Species NSW & QLD

Photos with enlarged views and descriptions for identification of Australian native Grevilleas and rainforest tree species. Australian Grevillea species photos showing bark, flower, fruit and leaf samples. All Creative Designs Nambucca & Coffs Harbour® presents native Australian tree images for identification purposes. The rainforest image folder below is constantly extended, revised and updated. Find something new each time you visit our web site. The target of these web pages is to show the diversity and magnificence of Australia's remaining rainforests areas in an accessible way.
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Identification tree photos are ordered by most used common name in alphabetical order, see page links below.
 Tree Pages:   1   A - Bl  |     2   Bo - Br  |     3   C - D  |     4   E - Euca  |     5   F - Figs  |     6   F - G  |     7   H - M  |     8   N - P  |     9   R - Si  |     10   Sm - Syz  |     11   T - V  |     12   W - Z    
See our Leaf Characteristic Page for explanations on leaf and vegetative characteristics mentioned in descriptions to the right.
Know what you are looking for; use our species list with links to relevant tree images and descriptions.
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Native Australian Tree Species Identification
Leaf Characteristics Page
Flower Characteristics Page
Species List Common OR Botanical
Reference Resources
Invasive (noxious) Trees & Shrubs Grevillea Species, Trees Australia
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Foambark Tree Jagera pseudorhus Other names: Pink Foambark
Small tree species with a dense and rounded canopy found naturally in different types of rainforests (Photo 1). Bark is a light grey colour with a hard and firm texture (2). A small yellow and pink flower develops into a hairy capsule up to 2 cm across, turning from a bright pink to brown in colour (3). Pinnate or bipinnate compound leaves with a varied arrangement consist of up to 20 leaflets which are; lanceolate to narrow elliptic in shape, oppositely arranged with toothed margins, up to 8 cm long and finely hairy. Smaller branches, petiole and petiolules are also covered in fine brown hair (4 & 5). Distribution: From mid-north coast of NSW to central QLD. (See Leaf Characteristics) for more information on definitions used.

Foambark Tree Jagera pseudorhus
Foambark Tree Bark Jagera pseudorhus
Foambark Tree Flower & Fruit Jagera pseudorhus
Jagera pseudorhus Foambark Leaves
Jagera pseudorhus Leaf
Foambark Tree
Foambark Tree Bark
Foambark Flower & Fruit
Jagera pseudorhus Leaves
Foambark Tree Leaf
         
Forest Maple Cryptocarya rigida Other names: Rose Maple
This beautiful small understorey tree species is found on margins of subtropical rainforests or in adjacent sclerophyll forests (Photo 1). Bark is a light grey in colour and features softer corky warts and some fissures but is otherwise quite firm in texture, bark on saplings is dark grey to nearly black (2). The evenly white and waxy covering on the lower leaf surface and the neatly arranged foliage are good identification characteristics, as are the finely brown hairy growth buds (3). The fruit maturing in mid to late summer is; oval shaped with a an obvious narrowed base, up to 25 mm long and shiny dark blue to black in colour containing a beautiful pink seed with longitudinal markings (4). Simple leaves with an alternate arrangement are; elliptic to obovate in shape with entire margins, between 5 to 14 cm long, dark green, hairless and semi glossy on top, whitish grey, waxy and finely hairy beneath, rather firm, smooth in texture and emit a fruity smell when crushed. Leaf apex is acute ending in a fine point, base shape is varied from rounded to more cuneate. Mid and lateral veins are raised on lower leaf surface (5) . Distribution: From NSW central coast to southern QLD.

Forest Maple Cryptocarya rigida
Forest Maple Bark Cryptocarya rigida
Forest Maple Cryptocarya rigida
Cryptocarya rigida Fruit & Seed
Forest Maple Leaves Cryptocarya rigida
Forest Maple
Cryptocarya rigida
Forest Maple Foliage
Cryptocarya rigida Fruit & Seed
Forest Maple Leaves
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Forest Oak Allocasuarina torulosa Other names: Mountain Forest Oak, Rose Sheoak
This native tree occurs in tall forests adjacent to different rainforest types mostly as an understorey species and can reach up to 30 m in height under favourable conditions ( Photos 1 & 2). Bark is brown in colour, rough with deep fissures and a hard texture (3). Cones are up to 3 cm in length containing numerous small brown winged seeds (4) . Branchlet with male flowers (5). Distribution: NSW south coast to northern QLD.

Forest Oak Allocasuarina turulosa
Forest Oak Allocasuarina turulosa
Mountain Forest Oak Trunk
Casuarina torulosa Cone Forest Oak
Forest Oak Branchlet Allocasuarina turulosa
Forest Oak
Allocasuarina torulosa
Mountain Forest Oak Trunk
Forest Oak Cone
Forest Oak Branchlet
         
Furry Nightshade Solanum hapalum
This small shrub rarely reaches more than 1m in height and is found in a range of environments from within different rainforest types to drier open tall Eucalypt forests (shown). It has an upright habit and is often found in small groups (1). Bark on older specimens is slightly rough, sometimes scaly in texture and an olive green to more brown in colour (2). Beautiful flowers reach on average 15 mm in diameter and show 5 fused petals being a rather uniform mauve to more purple in colour. Flowering takes place over spring (3). The fruit turns bright red in colour when fully mature and is globular in shape. It measures less than 1 cm across with the hairy sepals of the remaining flower calyx (base) partly covering the fleshy berry (4). Simple leaves with an alternate arrangement are; ovate in shape with entire margins, up to 8 cm in length, green with a grey hue on top, grey to yellowish green beneath, densely covered in hair on both surfaces and softly furry in texture. Leaf apex is acute, base shape varies from rounded to cordate and is often asymmetric. The petiole (leaf stalk) is very hairy and reach up to 3 cm in length. Hairy veins are raised and more obvious on lower leaf surface (5). Distribution: From NSW south coast to southern QLD.

Furry Nightshade Solanum hapalum
Furry Nightshade Solanum hapalum
Furry Nightshade Solanum hapalum
Furry Nightshade Solanum hapalum
Furry Nightshade Solanum hapalum
Furry Nightshade
Furry Nightshade Bark
Solanum hapalum Flower
Furry Nightshade Fruit
Furry Nightshade Leaves
Giant Stinging Tree Dendrocnide excelsa
Large rainforest tree species with a fast and erect growing habit found in subtropical rainforests from NSW south coast to central QLD (Photo1). Bark is fairly soft to the touch and coloured grey to brown, but is often covered by mosses and lichen (2). Foliage on mature trees is frequently damaged by insects, whereby leaves in sapling trees are less affected. Leaves in juvenile specimens are up to 35 cm long (3 & 4). Very painful stinging hairs cover the underside especially the veins of the leaf. Simple adult leaves are; up to 20 cm long, mostly round in shape with entire or toothed margins, alternate leaf arrangement with a prominent petiole sometimes more than 10 cm long (5). Note: Even half decayed leaves lying on the forest floor will still have a stinging effect. See also Shiny-leaved Stinging Tree Dendrocnide photinophylla Page 9.

Giant Stinging Tree Dendrocnide excelsa
Giant Stinging Tree Trunk
Dendrocnide excelsa Giant Stinging Tree
Australian Giant Stinging Tree
Stinging Hairs Dendrocnide excelsa
Giant Stinging Tree
Giant Stinging Tree Trunk
Dendrocnide excelsa
Giant Stinging Tree Leaves
Stinging Hairs Dendrocnide excelsa
         
Golden Guinea Tree Dillenia alata
Medium sized tree species attaining a height of up to 20m which occurs in tropical QLD (Photo 1). Distinctive red brown coloured bark has a soft and flaky texture (2). Very attractive white flowers held on long tendrils up to 1m long growing on larger branches of the Golden Guinea tree (3). Very glossy foliage features large leaves with entire margins up to 20 cm long, broadly oblong in shape with a rounded apex and a firm and leathery texture (4 & 5).

Golden Guinea Tree Dillenia alata
Dillenia alata Bark
Dillenia alata Flower
Golden Guinea Tree Foliage
Golden Guinea Tree Leaves
Golden Guinea Tree QLD
Dillenia alata Bark
Dillenia alata Flower
Golden Guinea Foliage
Golden Guinea Leaves
         
Grease Nut Tree Hernandia bivalvis
The Grease Nut Tree Hernandia bivalvis is a small to medium sized native tree species with a lush canopy reaching a height of up to 20 m, it prefers dryer forms of rainforests and now is uncommon in its natural habitat (Photo 1). Bark is light to dark olive green in colour and despite burls and small fissures has a rather smooth texture (2). A very attractive flowering display takes place over late spring into early summer with individual flowers being held in tightly packed panicles emerging towards the end of young branches. Flowers measure up to 3 cm in diameter and feature mostly eight pure white petals and four prominent stamens topped by red anthers with the developing bracts (part of a flower appearing to be leaf like) surrounding and protecting the ovary (3). The fruit turns black when ripe and is about 4 cm in diameter, the persistent and overlapping bracts change to orange/red in colour with full maturity (4). Simple leaves with an alternate arrangement are; up to 10 cm in length, ovate in shape with entire inrolled margins, hairless, dark green, glossy on top with a strong a fairly stiff texture. Leaf apex is short acuminate ending in a blunt point, base shape is rounded. Reticulate venation is very prominent on both leaf surfaces, with small bristle like domatia showing in lateral vein axils (5). Distribution: South eastern QLD, now increasingly rare in its natural range.

Grease Nut Tree Hernandia bivalvis
Grease Nut Tree Bark Hernandia bivalvis
Hernandia bivalvis Flower Grease Nut Tree
Grease Nut Tree Fruit Hernandia bivalvis
Grease Nut Tree Leaves Hernandia bivalvis

Grease Nut Tree

Grease Nut Tree Bark
Hernandia bivalvis Flower
Grease Nut Tree Fruit
Grease Nut Tree Leaves
         
Green Banksia Banksia robur
The Green Banksia Banksia robur is a native shrub under 5 m preferring swampy conditions in coastal areas (Photo 1). Bark is grey in colour with a firm and rather rough texture featuring small fissures (Photo 2). Beautiful large flower spikes up to 20 cm in length are a golden yellow colour (3). Simple leaves start in a whorl (4 to 5) arrangement beneath the growing bud turning alternate thereafter and are; large at 25 cm or more in length, elliptic in shape with irregular toothed margins, mid green, hairless and fairly glossy on top , pale yellow to cream and velvet beneath, very firm and stiff in texture. Lower leaf surface, mid vein and laterals are covered in short fine hair. Teeth are tipped with strong and sharp callous spines (5). Distribution: NSW south coast to northern QLD. See Flower Characteristics Page and Leaf Characteristics Page for information on terms used.

Green Banksia Banksia robur
Green Banksia Bark Banksia robur
Green Banksia Flower Banksia robur
Green Banksia Leaf Banksia robur
Green Banksia Venation Banksia robur
Green Banksia
Green Banksia Bark
Banksia robur Flower
Green Banksia Leaf
Green Banksia Venation
         
Green Bolly Gum Neolitsea australiensis Other names: Grey Bolly Gum
Handsome small to medium sized tree often found as an understorey species in different types of rainforests ranging from NSW central coast to central QLD (Image 1). Bark is a greyish white colour with a firm and hard texture (2). New growth is a striking pink and very soft compared to the firm mature leaves . Petioles (See Leaf characteristics) are up to 3 cm long and more or less hairless compared to the White Bolly Gum (Neolitsea dealbata ) (3). Fruit is globose in shape up to 12 mm across and changes from green over red to a dark purple color with age, containing a single seed (4). Simple leaves are arranged in a whorl below the growing bud; are up to 15 cm long, elliptic to lanceolate in shape with entire margins. The white colour of the leaf's underside is caused by a waxy coating which can be rubbed off (5).

Green Bolly Gum Neolitsea australiensis
Green Bolly Gum Trunk
Neolitsea australiensis Green Bolly Gum Bud
Green Bolly Gum Fruit Neolitsea australiensis
Green Bolly Gum Leaf Neolitsea australiensis
Bolly Gum Green
Green Bolly Gum
Neolitsea australiensis Bud
Green Bolly Gum Fruit
Green Bolly Gum Leaf
         
Green-leaved Rose Walnut Endiandra muellerii subsp. muellerii  Other names: Mueller's Walnut
The Green-leaved Rose Walnut or Mueller's Walnut is a native tree species which can reach a height of up to 35m within fertile subtropical rainforests, but is often encountered at a smaller size within littoral and warm temperate rainforests. It is very common as a rainforest regeneration tree and found as one of the first species to recolonize adjoining tall forests (Photo 1). Mature specimens feature a flanged and buttressed trunk. The bark is hard and rather rough in texture with small vertical ridges and scattered rounded depressions after shedding; colour is a greyish brown (2). Small pink flowers form in drooping panicles and blossom in late spring to early summer (3). Attractive new spring growth flushes first in a rose to red colour turning to salmon and light green when maturing. Mature simple leaves with an alternate arrangement are up to 11 cm in length, elliptic to broad elliptic in shape with entire and sometimes undulating margins, hairless, dark green and semi glossy on top, slightly paler but also shiny beneath with a smooth, firm and leathery texture. Apex is acute to short acuminate ending in a blunt point, base shape is cuneate to rounded. Petiole measures up to 1 cm in length. Center vein and laterals are noticeably raised on lower leaf surface and net veins are visible. Domatia are shallow pockets (mostly more inconspicuous than the domatium shown in red circle) which are not present on every leaf. For identification check a number of leaves on different branches (Photos 4 & 5). Distribution: NSW central coast to QLD.
Green-leaved Rose Walnut Endiandra muellerii subsp. muellerii
Green-leaved Rose Walnut Bark Endiandra muellerii subspecies muellerii
Green-leaved Rose Walnut Flower Endiandra muellerii subspecies muellerii
Endiandra muellerii subspecies muellerii Leaves Green-leaved Rose Walnut
Green-leaved Rose Walnut Domatium Endiandra muellerii subspecies muellerii
Green-leaved Rose Walnut
G-l. Rose Walnut Bark
G-l. Rose Walnut Flower
Green-leaved Rose Walnut Leaves
G-l. Rose Walnut Domatium
         
Green Wattle Acacia irrorata Other names: Blueskin
This species of Acacia is is widely distributed along the NSW coastline and under favourable conditions can reach a height of 10m. The Green Wattle is mostly found in open tall forests, in rainforest transition zones and as regrowth in disturbed sites and along rural roads (Picture 1). Bark on mature specimens is shades of grey in colour with a firm and slightly rough texture featuring small vertical ridges, cracks are caused by sudden growth spurts due to wet conditions (Pic 2). Globose (rounded) flower heads are up to 8 mm in diameter and are first whitish in colour turning to a golden yellow with maturity. Racemes up to 10 cm in length can hold up to 20 separate flower heads (Pic 3). Fruiting flower pods are up to 12 cm in length and covered in very fine hair (Pic 4). The bipinnate leaf arrangement continuing on mature specimens features leaflets up to 20 mm in length, where young growth is a bright yellow in colour. The red growths shown in the picture are called jugary glands and can be pale yellow to bright red in colour which are also a good identification feature of this species (Pic 5). Distribution: NSW coast to QLD. See Flower Characteristics Page and Leaf Characteristics Page for information on terms used.

Green Wattle Acacia irrorata
Green Wattle Bark Acacia irrorata
Acacia irrorata Flower Heads Green Wattle
Green Wattle Seed Pods Acacia irrorata
Green Wattle Leaf & Jugary Glands Acacia irrorata
Green Wattle
Green Wattle Bark
Acacia irrorata Flower
Acacia irrorata Seed Pods
Green Wattle Leaf & Jugary Glands
         

Grevilleas

The genus of Australian Grevilleas is well known for its unusual and amazing flowers leading to many cultivars used in today's gardens and landscaping. Growth habit can range from a small woody shrub to a tall tree as is the case with the Silky Oak Grevillea robusta. Leaf shapes and arrangements are very varied in this native tree genus.

Blue Grevillea Grevillea shiressii
The Blue Grevillea is an endangered species and only found within a small area around the NSW central coast (Photo 1). Bark is firm with wart-like lumps and small fissures, colour is dark grey to nearly black (2). Young branchlets are coloured a reddish brown with a smooth bark texture (3). Amazing flowers white and blue/mauve in colour are held on long green stems and measure about 20mm in length (4). Simple leaves alternately arranged are; up to 18 cm in length with entire and wavy margins, narrow lanceolate to oblong in shape, dark green and shiny on top with a paler underside, medium thick and firm in texture. Venation is finely reticulate, mid vein yellowish and raised on lower surface (5).

Grevillea shiressii Blue Grevillea
Grevillea shiressii Bark
Grevillea shiressii Foliage
Grevillea shiressii Flower
Grevillea shiressii Leaves Blue Grevillea
Blue Grevillea
Grevillea shiressii
Blue Grevillea Foliage
Grevillea shiressii Flower
Grevillea shiressii Leaves
         
Byfield Spider Flower Grevillea venusta
The Byfield Spider Flower Grevillea venusta is a large shrub or small multi-trunked tree and one of the best examples in showing astonishing and remarkable flowers (Photo 1). Bark is a beige brown in colour, rough with fissures, blisters and cracks showing an reddish brown under layer (2). Vivid coloured fruit covered in long fine hair matures as a follicle up to 15 mm long (3). Green and bright yellow flowers with long blue styles covered in white hair are held on racemes up to 10 cm long (4) Simple leaves with an alternate arrangement are; more than 20 cm in length with either entire or deeply lobed margins, narrow lanceolate in shape, medium thick and fairly firm, dark green and semi glossy on top, light pale green underneath and mostly hairless. Venation overall is faint but mid vein is raised on lower surface and fine laterals are straight and steep angled (5). Distribution: Naturally only occurring in a small area in central QLD.

Grevillea venusta Byfield Spider Flower
Grevillea venusta Byfield Spider Flower
Grevillea venusta Byfield Spider Flower
Byfield Spider Flower Grevillea venusta
Grevillea venusta Byfield Spider Flower
Byfield Spider Flower
Grevillea venusta Bark
Grevillea venusta Fruit
Byfield Spider Flower
Grevillea venusta Leaves
         
Red Spider Flower Grevillea oleoides Other names: Olive Grevillea
The Red Spider Flower Grevillea oleoides or Olive Grevillea is a small native shrub up to 3 m in height with a limited distribution range preferring moist locations in sclerophyll forests (Photo 1). Bark is grey to light brown in colour with fine fissures and a rough texture (2). Striking dark pink or red flowers measure up to 4 cm across and appear over winter and early spring (3 & 4). Simple leaves with an alternate arrangement are; up to 12 cm in length with entire and incurved margins, linear to narrow obovate in shape, mid-green and dull on top, grey green and finely hairy below with a firm texture. Apex is acute, base shape is attenuate. Mid vein is strongly raised on lower leaf surface, otherwise venation is very faint (5). Distribution: Southern areas of Sydney, Port Jackson and Robertson.

Red Spider Flower Grevillea oleoides Olive Grevillea
Red Spider Flower Bark Grevillea oleoides
Grevillea oleoides Flowering Olive Grevillea
Olive Grevillea Flower Grevillea oleoides Red Spider Flower
Red Spider Flower Leaves Grevillea oleoides Olive Grevillea
Red Spider Flower
Red Spider Flower Bark
Grevillea oleoides
Olive Grevillea Flower
Red Spider Flower Leaves
         
Serrated-leaved Grevillea Grevillia longifolia
Native shrub up to 5m in height with a very distinctive foliage and limited distribution range (Photo 1). Bark is a reddish brown in colour, with a rough fibrous and fissured texture (2). The glossy foliage with its nearly white underside is a good identification characteristic (3). Stunning deep pink to red flowers heads are born in winter to early spring and are up to 8 cm long (4). Simple leaves with an alternate arrangement are; elongated up to more than 20 cm in length with irregular toothed margins, firm to stiff in texture, very narrowly elliptic to oblong in shape, deep green and glossy on top. Lower leaf surface is a silvery white colour and features a prominently raised mid vein (5). Natural distribution: Central coast of NSW.

Grevillea longifolia Serrated-leaved Grevillea
Grevillea longifolia Bark Serrated-leaved Grevillea
Serrated-leaved Grevillea Foliage Grevillea longifolia
Grevillea longifolia Flower Serrated-leaved Grevillea
Serrated-leaved Grevillea Leaves Grevillea longifolia
Serrated-leaved Grevillea
Grevillea longifolia
Serrated-leaved Grevillea
Grevillea longifolia Flower
Grevillea longifolia Leaves
         
Silky Oak Grevillea robusta
The Silky Oak Grevillea robusta is a well known tree species reaching 30m or more in height and is often seen planted as a street tree or in plantation for its beautiful timber (Photos 1 & 2). Bark is dark grey in color, hard and furrowed (3). For a short period in spring the tree nearly loses all of its foliage followed by vivid bright yellow and orange coloured flowers (4). Bipinnate compound leaves are up to 30 cm in length with more than 50 leaflets which are up to 5 cm long, elliptic in shape and feature a pale underside covered in fine hair (5). Distribution: Mid-north coast of NSW to southern QLD.

Silky Oak Grevillea robusta
Grevillea robusta Silky Oak
Grevillea robusta Bark
Grevillea robusta Flower
Silky Oak Leaf
Silky Oak
Grevillea robusta
Silky Oak Bark
Grevillea robusta Flower
Silky Oak Leaf
         
White Oak Grevillea baileyana
This small to medium sized tree species originates in tropical rainforests, but is widely used as an ornamental tree along Australia's east coast for its beautiful foliage and flower display. It can reach up to 30m in its natural habitat competing for light, whereas planted in more open location a height of less than 15m is normal (Photo 1). Bark on the lower trunk of older specimens is hard, scaly and fissured in texture. Bark on branches and young trees is smoother and grey in colour (2). Pleasantly scented flower racemes are cream or pale yellow colored and appear at end of young branches from late winter to early summer depending on location (3). The fruit is a follicle splitting at one side only and measures up to 15 mm in length. It contains a number of flattened and winged seeds which are brown in colour (4). The very attractive leaves are deeply lobed on young trees and sometimes also present on older specimens. Simple adult leaves (shown) with an alternate arrangement are; lanceolate in shape with entire margins, between 10 to 20 cm in length (juvenile up to 30 cm), mid to dark green, hairless on top, bronze to rusty brown and hairy beneath with a strong and firm texture. Leaf apex tapers into a fine point, base shape is attenuate. Mid vein is hairy and raised on lower leaf surface (5). Distribution: Tropical northern QLD.

Grevillea baileyana White Oak
Grevillea baileyana Bark White Oak
White Oak Flower Grevillea baileyana
Grevillea baileyana Fruit White Oak
Grevillea baileyana Leaves White Oak
White Oak
White Oak Bark
White Oak Flower
Grevillea baileyana Fruit
White Oak Leaves
         
White Yiel-Yiel Grevillea hilliana Other names: Yiel-Yiel, Hill's Silky Oak
This medium sized native tree species grows to a height of up to 25m with an erect and slender trunk. It is very uncommon in its natural habitat of subtropical rainforests (Photo 1). Bark is a reddish brown in colour with a rough and flaky texture at the base of the trunk, whereas the higher part and branches feature a smoother textured bark which is more beige in colour (Photos 2 & 3). The flower racemes can be more than 20 cm in length holding numerous small whitish blossom opening in late spring (4). Simple leaves with an alternate arrangement on mature specimens (juveniles have lobed leaves up to 50 cm in length) are; up to 30 cm in length with entire margins, mostly elliptic or lanceolate in shape, dark green, very glossy and hairless on top, grey whitish beneath with a covering of fine hair, strong and rather stiff in texture. Leaf apex is acute ending in a blunt point, base shape is cuneate or sometimes more attenuate. The short petiole measures up to 10 mm in length. Reticulate venation is very apparent on lower leaf surface (5). Distribution: NSW north coast to QLD.

Grevillea hilliana White Yiel-Yiel, Hill's Silky Oak
White Yiel-Yiel Bark, Grevillea hilliana, Hill's Silky Oak
Grevillea hilliana Yiel-Yiel, Hill's Silky Oak
White Yiel-Yiel Flower Grevillea hilliana
White Yiel-Yiel Leaves, Hill's Silky Oak, Grevillea hilliana
White Yiel-Yiel
White Yiel-Yiel Bark
Grevillea hilliana
Yiel-Yiel Flower
White Yiel-Yiel Leaves
         
Grey Myrtle Backhousia myrtifolia Other names: Ironwood, Carrol
The Grey Myrtle Backhousia myrtifolia also called Carrol or Ironwood is a widespread native tree species found in different forest types and under favourable conditions can reach a height of up to 20m (Photo1). Bark on older specimens is; very hard, rough, fissured and depending on conditions more grey or brown in colour (2). Attractive flowers a pure white in colour and measure up to 15 mm in diameter (3). The fruit still resembles the shape of a flower as the calyx (base) of the original flower enlarges and partly encloses the ripe fruit (4). Growing buds, immature leaves and young stems are finely hairy. Mature simple leaves are; hairless, small at 3 to 6 cm in length, broad elliptic to ovate in shape with entire and slightly incurved margins, dark green and glossy on top, paler beneath, thin but firm in texture and scented when crushed. Leaf apex is short to long acuminate ending in a fine point, base shape is mostly rounded. Mid vein is raised on both surfaces, straight and numerous lateral veins are more visible below (5). Distribution: NSW south coast to central QLD.

Grey Myrtle Backhousia myrtifolia Ironwood Carrol
Grey Myrtle Bark Backhousia myrtifolia
Backhousia myrtifolia Flower Grey Myrtle
Grey Myrtle Fruit Backhousia myrtifolia
Grey Myrtle Leaves Backhousia myrtifolia
Grey Myrtle
Grey Myrtle Bark
Backhousia myrtifolia Flower
Grey Myrtle Leaves
Grey Myrtle Leaves 'lower'
Grey Possumwood Quintinia verdonii Other names: Smooth Possumwood
This elegant native tree species grows up to 25 m in height and is found in warm temperate and subtropical rainforests (Photo 1). The bark is a mostly uniform grey in colour with a soft, smooth and corky feel (Photo 2). The foliage featuring large glossy leaves is very distinctive in its sub tropical rainforest habitat (3). Erect flower spikes are up to 15 cm long and appear in early spring (4). Growing shoots and petioles are often a vivid red. Large simple leaves are mainly obovate in shape; up to 20 cm in length (often larger on saplings), with a firm and stiff texture. Petiole is grooved on the top, fleshy and often coloured red, useful identification characteristic. Leaf arrangement is alternate (5). Distribution: Along the east coast of Australia from central NSW to southern QLD.

Grey Possumwood Quintinia verdonii
Quintinia verdonii Bark
Quintinia verdonii Grey Possumwood
Grey Possumwood Flower Quintinia verdonii
Grey Possumwood Leaf Quintinia verdonii
Grey Possumwood
Quintinia verdonii Bark
Quintinia verdonii
Grey Possumwood Flower
Grey Possumwood Leaf
         
Guilfoylia Guilfoylia monostylis Other names: Scrub Ooline
Guilfoylia is a small to medium sized tree species reaching a height of 15m or more and can be found in a range of different rainforest types (Photo 1). The bark is coloured brown to grey with longitudinal fissures (Pictures 2 & 3). The zigzag shape of the branchlets is a characteristic helping to identify this tree species. Leaf arrangement is alternate (4). Simple leaves with entire margins and a firm and leathery texture are: up to 14cm long, elliptic to oblong in shape and feature visible domatia on the lower leaf surface along the mid vein. Apex is short acuminate, base shape is cuneate (5). Distribution: From NSW mid-north coast to central QLD.

Guilfoylia monostylis
Guilfoylia Trunk
Guilfoylia monostylis Bark
Guilfoylia monostylis Branchlet
Guilfoylia monostylis Leaves
Guilfoylia
Guilfoylia Trunk
Guilfoylia monostylis Bark
Guilfoylia Branchlet
Guilfoylia Leaves
         
Guioa Guioa semiglauca
Small to medium sized tree species found in range of habitats, from margins of STRf and along creek banks to a drier environment within tall forest. Often growing in stands and as regrowth (Photo 1). Buttress roots will form on more mature specimen. Bark is different tones of grey in colour with lighter patches, some white spots are due to lichen growth (2). Tiny white flowers with pink anthers measure only a couple of millimeters across and blossom over spring (3) Compound leaves with an alternate arrangement feature 2 to 6 leaflets which are; obovate in shape as new growth, more elliptic in shape when maturing, firm and rather leathery in texture. Leaflets are up to about 12 cm in length with underside being a pale whitish green in appearance. Leaflet apex is varied from rounded and often notched (emarginate) to acute , base shape is cuneate (4 & 5). Distribution: NSW south coast to central QLD.

Guioa semiglauca Stand
Guioa semiglauca trunk
Guioa semiglauca Flower
Guioa Foliage
Guioa Leaf surfaces
Guioa Stand
Guioa Trunk
Guioa semiglauca Flower
Guioa semiglauca Foliage
Guioa Leaf surfaces
         
Gunn's Phyllanthus Phyllanthus Gunnii Other names: Shrubby Spurge
The natural habitat of this shrub includes tall open forests, rainforests and their margins where as an understorey species it can reach a height of up to 3m (Photo 1). Bark on older specimens is light brown in color, firm and rough in texture showing fine cracks (fissures) and small ridges (2). Tiny flowers are yellowish green in colour and only measure 2 to 3 mm in length. Flowering period is spring and summer (3). The drooping fruit ( a capsule) is red in colour with some greenish patches and rounded apple-like in shape. It measures up to 4 mm in diameter and ripens over autumn (4). Simple leaves with an alternate arrangement are spaced at very regular intervals (2-ranked). They are; up to 2cm in length with entire margins, varied in shape from obovate or broad elliptic to nearly rounded, dark green and dull above, paler grey green below, hairless, thin and soft in texture. Leaf apex is rounded, base shape is rounded or broadly wedge shaped. Leaf stalk (petiole) is short a 1 to 2 mm in length. Lateral veins are fine, but clearly visible on lower leaf surface (5). Distribution: Vic., NSW & QLD.

Gunn's Phyllanthus Phyllanthus gunnii
Gunn's Phyllanthus Bark Phyllanthus gunnii
Gunn's Phyllanthus Flower Phyllanthus gunnii
Phyllanthus gunnii Fruit Gunn's Phyllanthus
Gunn's Phyllanthus Leaves Phyllanthus gunnii
Gunn's Phyllanthus
Gunn's Phyllanthus Bark
Gunn's Phyllanthus Flower
Phyllanthus gunnii Fruit
Gunn's Phyllanthus Leaves
         
We make an effort to properly name any tree species shown on this web page and cross referenced our images using these Resources to make sure that botanical identification is accurate. It is recommended to cross reference your plant material or photographs with the source list provided when identifying any Australian tree species. A personal interest in Australian forest tree species for more than twenty years provided the images, descriptions and measurements for any tree species shown. Information on distribution range of tree species has been collected using a selection of sources (see link above) including Botanical Gardens and local knowledge. The target of these web pages is to show the diversity and magnificence of our remaining rainforests areas. Our aim is to build up the awareness to the high conservation values these subtropical and tropical rainforest areas deserve.
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