Tree Page 4 E - Euca

Identify Native Australian Tree Species, Eucalyptus Species

Native Australian Eucalypt tree pictures showing enlarged views of fruit, leaf and bark samples that are useful in identification of native species. Quality pictures of native Eucalypt tree species with detailed descriptions explaining leaf shape, bark texture and distribution range. All Creative Designs Nambucca & Coffs Harbour® presents web optimized tree images for identification purposes as a free resource. The rainforest web photo page below is constantly revised, extended and updated. We hope to increase the awareness to the high protection values remaining rainforest areas in Australia still inherit.
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Identification tree photos are ordered by most used common name in alphabetical order, see page links below.
 Tree Pages:   1   A - Bl  |     2   Bo - Br  |     3   C - D  |     4   E - Euca  |     5   F - Figs  |     6   F - G  |     7   H - M  |     8   N - P  |     9   R - Si  |     10   Sm - Syz  |     11   T - V  |     12   W - Z    
See our Leaf Characteristic Page for explanations on leaf and vegetative characteristics mentioned in descriptions to the right.
Know what you are looking for; use our species list with links to relevant tree images and descriptions. JPG format thumbnail images are 180 x 135px (135 x 180 px) web optimised. JPG full size images are 800 x 600 px web optimzed (600 x 800 px).
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Click thumbnail images to view full size pictures. Eucalypt Native Australian Tree Species Identification
Leaf Characteristics Page
Flower Characteristics Page
Species List Common OR Botanical
Reference Resources
Invasive (noxious) Trees & Shrubs Identify Eucalyptus Species Australia NSW QLD VIC
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Picture 5
Elaeocarpus grahamii (No common name is recorded but Quandong is used)
This small to medium sized tree species is often multi-trunked with a well developed branch work starting at low heights, it occurs within tropical rainforests of northern QLD (Picture 1). Bark is grey or more olive green in colour, firm with a slightly rough texture due to fine vertical ridges (2). Flowers are very characteristic to the Elaeocarpus (Quandong) genus, they are; pure white in colour, scented, bell shaped with frilled petals and measure about 15 mm in length. They are held on very sticky racemes (3). The shiny blue fruit measures up to 12 mm in length and contains a single grooved and woody seed (4). Simple alternately arranged leaves are; obovate in shape, up to 15 cm in length with regularly toothed margins and a soft texture. Leaf apex is acute ending in a blunt point, base shape is rounded. Venation is prominent on both surfaces with the mid vein being slightly hairy. The strong petiole is about 4 cm in length and covered in fine, brown hair, also evident on young stems (5). Distribution: North QLD.

Elaeocarpus grahamii Quandong
Elaeocarpus grahamii Quandong
Elaeocarpus grahamii Quandong
Elaeocarpus grahamii Quandong
Elaeocarpus grahamii Quandong
Elaeocarpus grahamii
Quandong Bark
Elaeocarpus grahamii Flower
Elaeocarpus grahamii Fruit
Elaeocarpus grahamii Leaves
         
Elderberry Panax Polyscias sambucifolia
This native shrub spreading from underground rootstock is mostly found at less than 4 m in height but can sometimes develop into a small tree. It occurs in a range of different forest types including dryer, tall eucalypt forests and in regrowth areas (Picture 1). Bark is firm in texture, a grayish green in colour and covered in corky small bumps (lenticels) (2). Small flowers only measure up to 3 mm across and feature 5 stamens with prominent anthers, flowers are held on long spread-out panicles which end in an umbel arrangement of up to 12 individual flowers (3). The fruit is a fleshy drupe, rounded, flattened in shape and measuring up to 5 mm in length. It contains a single brown seed with a hard outer layer (4). The compound leaf features 5 to more than 10 separate leaflets which are; varied in length form 4 to 15 cm with irregular toothed margins, mostly lanceolate in shape, smooth, hairless, dark green above, light gray/green beneath. Apex is long acuminate, base shape is cuneate. Leaf like stipules are often present at the base of the compound leaf. Venation is more visible on the upper leaflet surface (5). Distribution: Wide-spread from VIC to southern QLD.
See Flower Characteristics Page and Leaf Characteristics Page for information on terms used.

Elderberry Panax Polyscias sambucifolia
Elderberry Panax Bark Polyscias sambucifolia
Polyscias sambucifolia Flower Elderberry Panax
Polyscias sambucifolia Fruit Elderberry Panax
Elderberry Panax Leaves Polyscias sambucifolia
Elderberry Panax
Elderberry Panax Bark
Polyscias sambucifolia Flower
Polyscias sambucifolia Fruit
Elderberry Panax Leaf
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Eucalypts

       
Leaves of Eucalyptus species are often very varied in size and shape throughout their development stages. They are classified as; seedling, juvenile, intermediate and adult leaves. Even mature trees can feature all types of leaves, as new shoots from trunk (coppice shoots), especially after bush fires. Eucalyptus trees listed below occur; close to the coast, in dry or wet open forests, in transition zones between rainforests and tall forests. Whereby Flooded Gum and Blue Gum can sometimes be found within the outer margins of rainforests. (See Flooded Gum)

Blackbutt Tree Eucalyptus pilularis
The Blackbutt tree is a very tall Eucalypt species reaching heights of more than 60 m occurring from the NSW south coast to southern QLD (Picture 1). Fibrous and rough bark covers the trunk to half or more of its height, often black at the base due to bush fires the normal bark colour is a greyish brown ( 2 & 3). Fruit is ovoid in shape and measures around 1 cm across with 4 valves. Simple leaves with entire margins are up to 18 cm long, lanceolate in shape, arranged alternate and scented when crushed
(4 & 5). See Leaf Characteristics Page for explanations of definitions used. Distribution: From northern VIC to southern QLD.

Eucalyptus pilularis
Eucalyptus pilularis
Blackbutt Bark
Blackbutt Leaves
Eucalyptus pilularis Leaves
Blackbutt Tree
Eucalyptus pilularis
Blackbutt Bark
Blackbutt Leaves & Fruit
Eucalyptus pilularis Leaf
         
Blue Gum Eucalyptus saligna Other names: Sydney Blue Gum
Tall tree species growing to a height of 60 m found on margins of STRf and in adjacent wet sclerophyll forests from NSW's south coast to central QLD (Picture 1 & 2). Bark above short rough barked stocking is very smooth, grey with blue - grey coloured flecks and markings after shedding. On the mid-north coast of NSW mature trees in their natural environment lose their rough bark at the base of the tree nearly entirely (1,2 & 3). Small fruit with 3 to 4 valves and exerted tips are only 5 mm wide (Pic 4). Simple leaves are narrow elliptic in shape, up to 18 cm long with entire margins and alternate leaf arrangement ( 5). Distribution: NSW south coast to southern QLD.

Blue Gum Eucalyptus saligna
Eucalyptus saligna
Blue Gum Bark
Sydney Blue Gum Fruit
Blue Gum Leaves
Blue Gum
Eucalyptus saligna
Blue Gum Bark
Blue Gum Fruit
Blue Gum Leaves
Cadaghi Eucalyptus torelliana Other names: Cadaga
The Cadaghi or Cadaga Eucalyptus torelliana can reach a height of 30m or more and is naturally found on margins of tropical rainforests and adjoining tall, open forests, but has been extensively planted as street tree in northern NSW (Picture 1). The bark on the lower half of the trunk is brown in colour with a rough and flaky texture, whereas the top half of the trunk and upper branches feature a smooth greyish green bark (2). Clusters (panicles) of white flowers borne at the end of branches measure 2 to 3 cm in diameter and blossom over late spring and early summer (3). Simple leaves with an alternate arrangement are up to 20 cm long, ovate in shape and hairy on immature specimens (4). Leaves on mature trees are; lanceolate in shape, up to 15 cm in length with entire margins, hairless, dark green and rather dull on upper surface, lighter green below with a firm texture. Leaf apex is acute, base shape is cuneate to rounded. Mid vein is raised on both surfaces and numerous straight lateral veins are obvious. Distribution: Restricted habitat of wet coastal areas and adjacent ranges in tropical QLD (Cairns and surrounding areas). Note: This tree is listed as an invasive species in a number of shires along the NSW north coast. See Flower Characteristics Page and Leaf Characteristics Page for information on terms used.

Cadaghi, Cadaga, Eucalyptus torelliana
Eucalyptus torelliana Bark Cadaga
Cadaghi, Cadaga, Flower Eucalyptus torelliana
Cadaghi, Leaves immature Eucalyptus torelliana
Cadaghi, Cadaga, Leaves Eucalyptus torelliana
Cadaghi
Eucalyptus torelliana Bark
Cadaghi Flower
Cadaghi, Cadaga Leaves
Cadaghi Leaves mature
 
Flooded Gum Eucalyptus grandis Other names: Rose Gum
Very tall forest tree up to 70 m in height. The specimen shown (Picture 1) resides within the outer margins of STRf and is surrounded by rainforest species like Black Booyong and Yellow Carabeen and its estimated height is above 60 m. A stocking of rough bark is retained at the base of the tree, but recedes with age (2 & 3). Relative small fruit measure only about 5 mm in diameter and feature 4 valves which are slightly exerted above the rim level. Image is showing the fruit before opening to the left and dehiscent to the right (4). Simple adult leaves are; arranged alternately, lanceolate in shape with entire margins, up to 18 cm in length and curved as intermediate leaves, shorter and straight as adult leaves (middle), scented when crushed. Apex is acute and base shape cuneate. Venation except for mid vein is very faint (5). Distribution: NSW central coast to northern QLD.

Flooded Gum Eucalyptus grandis
Flooded Gum Buttress
Flooded Gum Regrowth
Flooded Gum Nut
Eucalyptus grandis Leaves
Flooded Gum 'Giant'
Flooded Gum Trunk
Flooded Gum Regrowth
Eucalyptus grandis Fruit
Eucalyptus grandis Leaves
         
Grey Ironbark Eucalyptus paniculata
Under favourable conditions the Grey Ironbark Eucalyptus paniculata can reach a height of more than 40m (Picture 1). Bark is a mid grey in colour, hard and deeply furrowed. On adult specimens the rough bark continues to the smallest branches in a fairly open canopy (Pictures 2 & 3). Buds are a diamond like shape and up to 10mm in length (4). Simple alternate adult leaves are; up to 14 cm long with entire margins, lanceolate in shape, fairly thin, papery but strong, mid green on top, a lighter grey green beneath with an acute and fine pointed apex (5). Distribution: NSW south coast to NSW mid-north coast.

Grey Ironbark Eucalyptus paniculata
Grey Ironbark Eucalyptus paniculata
Grey Ironbark Eucalyptus paniculata
Grey Ironbark Eucalyptus paniculata
Grey Ironbark Eucalyptus paniculata
Grey Ironbark
Grey Ironbark Bark
Eucalyptus paniculata
Grey Ironbark Buds
Grey Ironbark Leaves
         
Grey Gum Small-fruited Eucalyptus propinqua
The small-fruited Grey Gum is a tall and erect tree species up to 45m in height, the straight trunk is often branchless to more than half of the tree's height. It's natural habitat are tall open forests from coastal to mountainous locations (Picture 1 & 2). Old slightly rough and granular bark is shed from the trunk in wide strips or irregular patches exposing new bright orange coloured bark (3). The woody fruit is reverse cone-shaped (obconical) and measures only up to 5 mm in diameter showing 4 valves (4).Simple adult leaves have an alternate arrangement and are; lanceolate in shape, up to 15 cm long with entire margins, dark green above, paler green beneath, firm, leathery in texture and scented when crushed. Leaf apex narrows into a very fine tip, base is broadly wedge-shaped (5). Distribution: NSW central coast to southern QLD.

Eucalyptus propinqua Grey Gum
Eucalyptus propinqua Grey Gum
Eucalyptus propinqua bark
Grey Gum Fruit
Grey Gum Fruit
Grey Gum Small-fruited
Eucalyptus propinqua
Grey Gum Bark
Grey Gum Fruit
Grey Gum Leaves
         
Grey Gum Eucalyptus punctata var. longirostrata
There are a number of Grey Gums which are very similiar in appearance, but can distinguished by the shape of the flower buds before opening. They are classified as variations of E.punctata, or as separate species in some publications. Shown here is E. punctata var. longirostrata, a tall tree up to 35m in height when growing in open tall forests, but is only a medium sized tree with a shorter bole in woodlands. The leaves of Grey Gums are a preferred food source for koalas (1). Bark is typical for a Grey Gum with newly exposed bark being salmon to nearly orange coloured with a very smooth texture. It weathers from light to dark grey and changes to a finely rough, granular texture, before shedding in irregular plates (2). A common flower stalk (peduncle) up to 2 cm in length holds normally up to 7 individual flowers. Pedicels are up to 1 cm in length and angular in shape. The beak-shaped cap (operculum) differentiates this species from other Grey Gums (3). The woody fruit shows 4 stout valve tips (sometimes only 3) extending past the broad and ascending rim (disc). It measures up to 15 mm across and 14 mm in height (4). Simple adult leaves with an alternate arrangement are; up to 18 cm in length, oblanceolate in shape, straight or sometimes falcate, firm and pleasantly scented when crushed. Leaf apex gradually tapers into a fine tip; base is cuneate and often oblique. Dried specimens shown. Distribution: Southern Qld.

Eucalyptus punctata Grey Gum
Eucalyptus punctata Grey Gum
Eucalyptus punctata Flower Buds Grey Gum
Eucalyptus punctata Fruit Grey Gum
Eucalyptus punctata Leaves Grey Gum
Grey Gum
Grey Gum Bark
E.punctata var. longirostrata
Grey Gum Fruit
Grey Gum Leaves
         
Lemon-scented Gum Eucalyptus citriodora Other names: Lemon-scented Iron Gum, Spotted Iron Gum
Strongly lemon-scented leaves has given this tree its' name and are of great help identifying this species, as it is of similar appearance to the Spotted Gum E. maculata. Mainly found in open forests along the coastal ranges it is a medium to large sized tree reaching heights of 30+ m with a columnar and upright trunk (Picture 1). Bark is shades of grey to bluish grey in colour without retaining any rough bark at the base, hard and smooth in texture. It is shed in small irregular plates exposing dark grey (blue grey) colored patches of fresh bark causing the mottling effect (more noticeable in wet times) (2). The woody fruit is mostly urn shaped, up to 1.5 cm in length and shows fine ridges and small warts (3). Simple leaves have an alternate arrangement. Juvenile leaves are up to 20 cm in length with entire margins, broadly lanceolate to nearly obovate in shape. Venation is more obvious in juvenile leaves, showing raised laterals and a clearly visible intra marginal vein (4). Adult leaves are only up to 15 cm long, very narrow lanceolate in shape, firm and strong in texture. All leaves, even dried specimens on the ground emit a strong lemon scent when crushed. Distribution: Mid-north coast NSW to northern QLD ( 2 subspecies E. citriodora ssp. variegata NSW/South QLD. E. citriodora ssp. citriodora N. QLD.)

Eucalyptus citriodora Lemon-scented Gum
Eucalyptus citriodora Bark Lemon-scented Gum
Eucalyptus citriodora Fruit Lemon-scented Gum
Eucalyptus citriodora intermediate Leaf Lemon-scented Gum
Eucalyptus citriodora Adult leaves Lemon-scented Gum
Lemon-scented Gum
Lemon-scented Gum Bark
Eucalyptus citriodora Fruit
Intermediate Leaf
Eucalyptus citriodora Leaves
         
Messmate Eucalyptus obliqua Other names: Messmate Stringybark
Under favourable conditions this tall Eucalyptus species can grow to 80m, but heights of under 50m are more common and in exposed costal locations it may only be the size of a shrub. It has a wide distribution range and prefers mountainous location for best development (Picture 1). Trunks on tall trees are columnar and branchless to half or more of its height (2). Bark is a reddish brown in colour with older surfaces weathering to grey. It is deeply furrowed and rather soft and fibrous in texture (3). The woody fruit varies from barrel shaped to more urn shaped and measures up to 12 mm in length. It has a rough surface and 3 or 4 slightly sunken valves (4). Simple adult leaves with an alternate arrangement are; broadly lanceolate or curved (falcate) in shape, up to 15 cm in length with entire margins, dark green, semi-glossy on top, similar green beneath (concolorous), firm and leathery in texture. Leaf apex gradually tapers into a fine point, base shape is oblique (asymmetric). Leaf stalk measures up to 15 mm in length (5). Distribution: TAS, VIC, NSW and southern QLD.

Messmate Eucalyptus obliqua
Messmate Eucalyptus obliqua
Messmate Eucalyptus obliqua
Eucalyptus obliqua Fruit Messmate
Messmate Leaves Eucalyptus obliqua
Messmate
Messmate Trunk
Messmate Bark
Eucalyptus obliqua Fruit
Messmate Leaves
         
New England Blackbutt Eucalyptus andrewsii subspecies andrewsii
This tall Eucalyptus species prefers locations at higher altitudes along the Great Dividing Range, where under good conditions it can reach a height of 40m or more. In tall open forests it develops a straight trunk devoid of major branches up to the height of the relatively open crown (Picture 1). Bark on mature trees shows vertical fissures and is rough and coarsely fibrous in texture. Weathered outside bark is grey in colour, fresh underlying bark light brown (2). Up to 15 separate flowers buds are grouped on a common stalk (peduncle) measuring up to 2 cm in length. Individual buds are up to 0.5 cm long and start appearing over winter time (3). The woody fruit is half rounded in shape and measures up to 5 mm in diameter, it shows 4 or sometimes 5 valves on level with the very wide rim (4). Simple adult leaves are; up to 18 cm in length with entire margins, falcate (sickle shaped) or more lanceolate, the same mid-green on both surfaces, rather dull, strong and leathery in texture. Leaf stalk (petiole) yellowish in colour and up to 2.5 cm long. Leaf apex very gradually narrows into a fine tip, base shape is uneven (oblique). Venation is inconspicuous showing a network of wavy lateral veins under closer inspection (5). Distribution: Higher country from the mid-north coast of NSW to central Qld.

New England Blackbutt Eucalyptus andrewsii subspecies andrewsii
New England Blackbutt Bark Eucalyptus andrewsii subspecies andrewsii
New England Blackbutt Flower Buds Eucalyptus andrewsii subspecies andrewsii
New England Blackbutt Fruit Eucalyptus andrewsii subspecies andrewsii
New England Blackbutt Leaves Eucalyptus andrewsii subspecies andrewsii
New England Blackbutt
N. E. Blackbutt Bark
Eucalyptus andrewsii Buds
New England Blackbutt Fruit
New Engand Blackbutt Leaves
         
Pink Bloodwood Eucalyptus intermedia [Corymbia intermedia]
The Pink Bloodwood tree is a medium to large sized tree species reaching 35m or more in height and is found in open, tall forests (Picture 1). Bark continuing to small branches is a pale grey brown colour, rough and scaly in texture with patches of exposed resin (2). The rather open canopy can spread to a wide margin (3). The woody fruit is urn or more barrel shaped and measures up to 2 cm in length, the outer surface is very rough, covered in small warts and speckles. Four deep seated valves release reddish brown seeds enclosed in a papery wing (4). Alternately arranged adult leaves are; lanceolate to broad lanceolate in shape with entire margins, between 8 to 16 cm in length, hairless and scented when crushed. Older leaves often turn red before falling (5). Distribution: NSW central coast to northern QLD.

Pink Bloodwood Corymbia intermedia
Pink Bloodwood Bark Corymbia intermedia
Corymbia intermedia Pink Bloodwood
Pink Bloodwood Fruit Corymbia intermedia
Pink Bloodwood Leaves Corymbia intermedia
Pink Bloodwood
Pink Bloodwood Bark
Corymbia intermedia
Pink Bloodwood Fruit
Pink Bloodwood Leaves
         
Red Bloodwood Tree Eucalyptus gummifera [Corymbia gummifera]
This tall native tree species is found in tall open (Eucalypt dominated) forests growing to a height of 45 m (Picture 1). Distinctive feature of this tree is the red sticky resin produced where an injury occurred or as a protection against termite attack (2). Bark is a reddish brown weathering to gray with a flaky, scaly texture covering the whole tree to the smallest branches ( 3). The woody fruit produced is urn-shaped and measures up to 2 cm in length. Four deep seated valves release brown coloured seeds with a small surrounding flange (4). Beautiful and strongly scented flowers open in midsummer. Simple leaves on mature specimens are; alternately arranged, lanceolate in shape with entire margins, hairless, scented and up to 15 cm long (5). Distribution: From VIC to southern QLD.

Corymbia gummifera Red Bloodwood Tree
Red Bloodwood Resin Corymbia gummifera
Red Bloodwood Bark Corymbia gummifera
Corymbia gummifera Fruit Red Bloodwood
Red Bloodwood FlowerCorymbia gummifera
Red Bloodwood Tree
Red Bloodwood Resin
Red Bloodwood Bark
Corymbia gummifera Fruit
Red Bloodwood Flower
         
Red Mahogany Eucalyptus resinifera Subspecies: hemilampra Other names: Red Messmate
Red Mahogany Eucalyptus resinifera is a tall tree reaching heights of more than 40 m and occurs mainly in tall open forests (Picture 1). The reddish brown bark is very stringy, fibrous in texture and can exude some resin (2). Flower buds are an elongated cone shape and measure up to 12 mm in length (3). The fruit can vary in shape from ovoid to more cup shaped and reaches up to 12 mm in length. 3 or sometimes 4 sharply pointed valve tips extend beyond the flat rim and release numerous fine brown seeds (4). Simple adult leaves are up to 12 cm long, mainly broadly lanceolate in shape with entire margins and an alternate leaf arrangement (5). Distribution: South coast of NSW to southern QLD.

Red Mahogany Eucalyptus resinifera
Eucalyptus resinifera Bark Red Mahogany
Eucalyptus resinifera Buds Red Mahogany Buds
Red Mahogany Fruit Leaves Buds
Red mahogany Leaves Eucalyptus resinifera
Red Mahogany
Eucalyptus resinifera
Eucalyptus resinifera Buds
Red Mahogany Fruit
Red Mahogany Leaves
         
Scribbly Gum Eucalyptus signata
This medium size tree species is most often found in wetter coastal areas or open forests attaining a height of up to 25m (Picture 1). The bark is smooth and firm, white to light grey in colour showing the distinctive scribbles (2). Branch work is limited to a a few steep angled main branches holding a very open canopy (3). Fruit is relatively small at 5 to 7mm in diameter and length featuring 4 exerted valves not raised above the level rim (4). The simple leaves (adult) with an alternate arrangement are; up to 15 cm long with entire margins (deformation are visible), lanceolate in shape, firm and leathery, hairless and scented, semi glossy and mid green in colour on both surfaces. Venation is faint but visible showing numerous straight lateral veins (5). Distribution: NSW central coast to southern QLD.

Scribbly Gum Eucalyptus signata
Scribbly Gum Bark Eucalyptus signata
Eucalyptus signata Foliage Scribbly Gum
Scribbly Gum Fruit Eucalyptus signata
Scribbly Gum Leaves Eucalyptus signata
Scribbly Gum
Scribbly Gum Bark
Eucalyptus signata
Scribbly Gum Fruit
Scribbly Gum Leaves
Spotted Gum Eucalyptus maculata
The distinctive bark is one of the first identification feature of the Spotted Gum Eucalyptus maculata. The height of this tall native tree species is up to 45 m or more under favourable conditions. It is found in in close proximity to the coast to within open forests along the ranges (Picture 1). The very smooth bark covers the whole tree (no rough stocking) and is various tones of grey in colour, changing with maturity and newly shed patches of bark (2). Ovoid shaped flower buds are up to 1cm in length (3). The fruit shown is in its' early development stage, still green in colour turning brown and woody with age. It measures up to 15 mm in length with deeply sunken valves and a thick rim (4). Alternate simple adult leaves are: up to 20 cm long with entire margins, lanceolate in shape (image is showing intermediate leaves which are slightly broader), grey green on top and similar colored below, firm and leathery. Apex is gradually tapering into a fine point (5). Distribution: NSW south coast to NSW mid-north coast. Similar in appearance to E. citriodora, but leaves of this species are not lemon-scented.

Spotted Gum Eucalyptus maculata
Spotted Gum Bark Eucalyptus maculata
Spotted Gum Buds Eucalyptus maculata
Spotted Gum Buds Eucalyptus maculata
Spotted Gum Leaves Eucalyptus maculata
Spotted Gum
Spotted Gum Bark
Eucalyptus maculata
Spotted Gum Fruit
Spotted Gum Leaves
         
Swamp Mahogany Eucalyptus robusta Other names: Swamp Messmate
The Swamp Mahogany reaches a height of about 30m with main branches starting at more than half the height of the normally straight trunk (Picture 1). Bark is persistent to the smallest branches; softly fibrous in texture and a light reddish brown in colour (2 & 3). The cylindrical shaped fruit is up to 16mm long and 10mm across featuring mostly 4 valves slightly raised above the rim level (4). Simple alternately arranged leaves are; up to 16 cm long with entire margins, broad lanceolate in shape which is a good identification characteristic, firm, leathery and scented when crushed. Venation overall is faint, mid vein raised on lower surface with numerous and straight lateral veins (5). Distribution: Coastal areas from NSW south coast to central QLD.

Swamp Mahogany Eucalyptus robusta
Eucalyptus robusta Swamp Mahogany
Swamp Mahogany Bark Eucalyptus robusta
Swamp Mahogany Fruit Eucalyptus robusta
Swamp Mahogany Leaf Eucalyptus robusta
Swamp Mahogany
Eucalyptus robusta
Swamp Mahogany Bark
Swamp Mahogany Fruit
Swamp Mahogany Leaf
         
Tallowwood Eucalyptus microcorys
Eucalyptus microcorys is a very large tree species and can grow to more than 60 m in height with a trunk diameter of more than 2 m (Picture 1). Bark is mostly light brown with a red tinge in colour and a soft fibrous texture (2). In winter to early spring (NSW north coast) masses of scented small white flowers appear, being held in groups of up to 12 in axillary joints towards the end of small branches (3). Fruit is small at up to 4 mm across with 3 or sometimes 4 valves (4). Simple leaves on adult specimens are up to 14 cm long with small irregular crenate margins and lanceolate in shape. Juvenile leaves are broadly ovate and up to 8 cm long (5). Distribution: NSW central coast to southern QLD.

Tallowwood Eucalyptus microcorys
Tallow Wood Bark
Tallowwood Flower Eucalyptus microcorys
Eucalyptus microcorys Fruit
Tallowwood Leaves
Tallowwood
Tallow Wood Bark
Tallowwood Flower
Eucalyptus microcorys Fruit
Tallowwood Leaves
         
White Mahogany Eucalyptus acmenoides Other names: Yellow Stringybark
Under favourable conditions White Mahogany Eucalyptus acmenoides can grow up to 60 m in height with trunk a measuring up to 1.5 m in diameter (Picture 1). Bark is greyish light brown, very fibrous and stringy, covering all parts of the tree (2 & 3). Fruit is up to 7 mm across and has mostly 4 valves (4). Simple adult leaves with an alternate arrangement and entire margins are up to 12 cm long and lanceolate in shape, whereby juvenile leaves are broader and reach 15 cm in length (5). Distribution: NSW central coast to Central QLD.

White Mahogany Eucalyptus acmenoides
Yellow Stringybark Eucalyptus acmenoides
Eucalyptus acmenoides Foliage
Eucalyptus acmenoides Fruit
White Mahogany Leaves
White Mahogany
Yellow Stringybark
Eucalyptus acmenoides
White Mahogany Fruits
Eucalyptus acmenoides Leaves
         
We attempted to properly describe any tree species shown on this web page and cross referenced our images using these Resources for accurate scientific identification . The description and measurements have been collected through a personal interest in our native forests for more than twenty years. Information such as distribution range of tree species has been put together using a selection of sources including various Botanical Gardens (see link above). The purpose of these web pages is to illustrate the beauty and diversity of our remaining rainforests on Australia's east coast. We aspire to increase the awareness to the high protection values these remaining subtropical and tropical rainforest areas still inherit.
Please note all images are copyright, watermarked and not to be used without prior permission by All Creative Designs® worldwide rights reserved.

 Tree Pages:   1   A - Bl  |     2   Bo - Br  |     3   C - D  |     4   E - Euca  |     5   F - Figs  |     6   F - G  |     7   H - M  |     8   N - P  |     9   R - Si  |     10   Sm - Syz  |     11   T - V  |     12   W - Z    
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