Tree Page 12 W - Z

Native Tree Identification on Australia's East Coast VIC, NSW, QLD

Tree identification for tropical, subtropical, warm temperate and cool temperate rainforest tree species along Australia's east coast. 5 full size pictures for every species showing tree characteristics which are useful in identification. The natural distribution range and special features useful in identification are given for every specimen listed on the web page below. All Creative Designs Nambucca & Coffs Harbour® presents native Australian tree images for identification purposes. You are welcome to Contact Us with any questions or feedback regarding Australian tree species . The rainforest tree image web page below is constantly extended, revised and updated. We aim to build up the awareness to the high conservation values Australian rainforest areas deserve. Identify native trees by leaf and other vegetative characteristics.
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Identification tree pictures are ordered by most used common name in alphabetical order, see page links below.
 Tree Pages:   1   A - Bl  |     2   Bo - Br  |     3   C - D  |     4   E - Euca  |     5   F - Figs  |     6   F - G  |     7   H - M  |     8   N - P  |     9   R - Si  |     10   Sm - Syz  |     11   T - V  |     12   W - Z    
See our Leaf Characteristic Page for explanations on leaf and vegetative characteristics mentioned in descriptions to the right.
Know what you are looking for or to locate related species (by genus); use our species list with links to relevant tree images and descriptions. JPG format thumbnail images are 180 x 135px (vertical 135 x 180 px) web optimised. JPG full size images are 800 x 600 px web optimized (vertical 600 x 800 px). All images copyright 2007 - 2014 by All Creative Designs® worldwide rights reserved.
Click thumbnail images to view full size pictures.
Native Australian Tree Species Identification
Leaf Characteristics Page
Flower Characteristics Page
Species List Common OR Botanical
Reference Resources
Invasive (noxious) Trees & Shrubs Trees Australia Identification Pictures, Photos, Images & Descriptions
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Image 5
Water Gum Tristaniopsis laurina
Water Gum originates from STRf and WTRf (Warm Temperate Rainforest) along Australia's east coast north from Victoria up to central QLD and is often found near creek banks (Image 1). Bark is grey in colour with a very smooth texture, turning brown before shedding in long strips (2). The foliage of Tristaniopsis laurina is dark green and shiny (3). Abundant beautiful small yellow flowers appear in spring and are followed by fruit ripening in late summer, each capsule containing a large number of small papery winged seeds. Simple leaves are up to 15 cm long, oblanceolate in shape, firm and leathery to the touch with entire margins and a paler underside (3,4 & 5). Notes: This species is very useful in riverbank regeneration planting for its hardiness in different environments and ability to stay submerged for days. See Leaf Characteristics Page for explanations of definitions used.

Water Gum Tristaniopsis laurina
Tristaniopsis laurina Trunk
Water Gum Tristaniopsis laurina Leaves
Tristaniopsis laurina Flower
Water Gum Fruit
Water Gum
Tristaniopsis laurina Trunk
Water Gum Foliage
Tristaniopsis laurina Flower
Water Gum Fruit
         
Wedge-leaved Tuckeroo Cupaniopsis wadsworthii Other names: Ducksfoot
The Ducksfoot or Wedge-leaved Tuckeroo Cupaniopsis wadsworthii is a native Australian shrub less than 5m in height (Image 1). Bark is grey in colour with a smooth and firm texture (2). The unusually shaped dark green and glossy foliage is a good identification feature (3). The fruit covered in very fine and short hair is up to 2 cm long and features 3 deep lobes containing up to 3 orange seeds (4). Mostly alternate arranged leaves on mature specimens consist of 2 to 4 leaflets which are; up to 8 cm long with entire margins, wedge shaped, glossy, medium thick and firm. Apex is truncated, base shape is cuneate. The mid vein is raised on lower surface and small domatia along it are visible (5). Distribution: Central to northern QLD.

Wedge-leaved Tuckeroo Cupaniopsis wadsworthii
Ducksfoot Bark Cupaniopsis wadsworthii
Cupaniopsis wadsworthii Foliage Wedge-leaved Tuckeroo
Wedge-leaved Tuckeroo Fruit Cupaniopsis wadsworthii
Wedge-leaved Tuckeroo Leaf Cupaniopsis wadsworthii
Wedge-leaved Tuckeroo
Ducksfoot Bark
Cupaniopsis wadsworthii
Wedge-leaved Tuckeroo Fruit
Wedge-leaved Tuckeroo Leaf
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Weeping Tea-tree Leptospermum brachyandrum Note: There is no official common name recorded, but Weeping Tea-Tree is widely used.
The Leptospermum brachyandrum is a tall shrub or small tree reaching a height of up to 6 meters under favorable conditions. Creek banks are its preferred habitat but the species is adaptable to dryer environments and mature specimens will show a drooping foliage (Image 1). Bark is shades of grey in colour shedding in rolled-up strips, exposing smooth fresh bark which is a pinkish light brown in colour (2). Flowers are characteristic for the Leptospermum genus featuring 5 white obovate shaped petals and measure less than 1 cm across, tight groups of up to 7 individual flowers appear over late spring to early summer from axillary joints towards end of young branches (3). The conical shaped fruit is about 5 mm in diameter at the top and crowned by five persisting sepals. It turns hard and woody before releasing numerous tiny light brown seeds from 3 rounded valves over autumn (4). Simple leaves with an alternate arrangement are; up to 5 cm in length with entire margins, linear to narrow lanceolate in shape, hairless when mature, scented when crushed and firm in texture. Leaf apex is rounded or more acute ending in a fine sharp point (mucronate), base shape is mostly cuneate. The petiole is very short and faint elliptical venation can be seen (5). Distribution: From NSW mid-north coast to Northern QLD. See Flower Identification and Leaf Characteristics Page for information on terms used.

Weeping Tea-tree Leptospermum brachyandrum
Leptospermum brachyandrum Bark Weeping Teatree
Leptospermum brachyandrum Flower Weeping Tea-tree
Leptospermum brachyandrum Fruit Weeping Tea-tree
Leptospermum brachyandrum Leaves Weeping Tea-tree
Weeping Tea-Tree
Weeping Tea-Tree Bark
Leptospermum brachyandrum
Weeping Tea-Tree Fruit
Weeping Tea-Tree Leaves
         
White Beech Gmelina leichhardtii
Large native tree species attaining a height of up 40m found in subtropical and littoral rainforests (Image 1). Bark is a mottled grey in colour, firm and hard with rounded scales and small fissures (2). The foliage can be identified by its pale underside and dark green glossy upper surface (3). Growing buds, petiole and twigs are densely covered in fine rusty brown hair. Leaf arrangement is opposed (4). Simple leaves are; up to 20 cm long with nearly entire margins, (compared to strongly toothed margins in juvenile leaves, as shown), ovate in shape, firm and slightly rough. Venation is clearly visible with the center vein being strongly raised on lower leaf surface, petiole is up to 25mm long (5). Distribution: From the south coast of NSW to central QLD

White Beach Gmelina leichhardtii
White Beech Bark
Gmelina leichhardtii Foliage
White Beech Bud
White Beech Leaves
White Beech
White Beech Bark
Gmelina leichhardtii
White Beech Bud
White Beech Leaves
White Bolly Gum Neolitsea dealbata
This species is very similar to the Green Bolly Gum Neolitsia australiensis but with a smaller growth habit less than 10m in height and is common understorey shrub or small tree within different types of rainforests (Images 1 & 2).The petiole which is up to 3 cm long and growing bud are covered in fine rusty brown hair (3). Interesting flowers coloured a golden yellow open in late summer and are held on older branches (4). Simple leaves with entire margins are mainly obovate in shape and up to 18 cm long compared to Green Bolly Gum's elliptic to lanceolate leaf shapes. Underside of leaf is coated in white waxy substance (5). Distributon: Ranging from the NSW central coast to central QLD.

White Bolly Gum Neolitsea dealbata
Neolitsea dealbata White Bolly Gum
White Bolly Gum Bud Neolitsea dealbata
White Bolly Gum Flower Neolitsea dealbata
White Bolly Gum Leaf Neolitsea dealbata
Bolly Gum White
Neolitsea dealbata
White Bolly Gum Bud
White Bolly Gum Flower
White Bolly Gum Leaf
         
White Booyong Argyrodendron trifoliolatum Other names: Brown Tulip Oak
The White Booyong or Brown Tulip Oak Argyrodendron trifoliolatum is a large tree species reaching up to 45 m in height and occurring within subtropical rainforests. Older specimens develop large buttress roots and a straight trunk (Images 1 & 2). Bark is a light brown in colour with distinct vertical fissures and a firm texture (3). Alternately arranged compound leaves have three leaflets (trifoliolate) which are; up to 15 cm long, oblong to elliptic in shape with wavy and entire margins, dark green and glossy on top, paler with a copper coloured sheen below (good identification feature), hairless and rather thin but strong in texture. Leaflet apex is short acuminate, base shape is cuneate. Venation is prominent with the center vein being raised on both leaflet surfaces. The strong petiole measures up to 50 mm in length (Photos 4 & 5). Distribution: Warmer subtropical rainforests from the mid-north coast of NSW to QLD. (See Leaf Characteristics Page for explanations of botanical terms used in descriptions.)

White Booyong Argyrodendron trifoliolatum
Argyrodendron trifoliolatum White Booyong Trunk
White Booyong Bark Argyrodendron trifoliolatum
 White Booyong Foliage Argyrodendron trifoliolatum
Argyrodendron trifoliolatum Leaves
White Booyong
Argyrodendron trifoliolatum
White Booyong Bark
White Booyong Foliage
White Booyong Leaves
         
White Carabeen Sloanea langii
This tall tree species can reach a height of 40m and is found in upland and lowland types of tropical rainforests, where it often forms the highest level in the canopy. Buttress roots are often present on mature specimens (1). Bark is brown in colour and has rough texture due to small blisters (lenticels) covering the surface (2). The fruit (a capsule) is fully covered in yellow colored bristles measuring up to 10 mm in length, which will detach when handled. The mature fruit will split into 3 or 4 segments (valves) releasing an oval shaped seed each, which is covered in an yellow to orange/red colored aril (depending on maturity and length of exposure). Fruit ripens over late winter into spring (3). Simple leaves with an alternate (spiral) arrangement are: up to 16 cm in length, ovate or oblanceolate in shape with shallow toothed or crenate margins, dark green, dull on upper surface, paler green beneath, hairless, strong with a dry and thick paper like texture. Leaf apex is acute ending in a blunt tip, base shape is cuneate. Strong petiole measures up to 4 cm in length. Venation is prominently raised on lower leaf surface (4 & 5). Distribution: From central to northern Qld. See also: Yellow Carabeen (Sloanea woollsii) lower on this page.

White Carabeen Sloanea langii
White Carabeen Bark Sloanea langii
Sloanea langii Fruit White Carabeen
Sloanea langii Branchlet White Carabeen
Sloanea langii Branchlet White Carabeen
White Carabeen
White Carabeen Bark
Sloanea langii Fruit
White Carabeen Branchlet
White Carabeen Leaves
         
White Cedar Melia azedarach
Deciduous tree species originating in different types of rainforests and is often used as a shade or street tree with a vibrant green new foliage appearing in early spring (Image 1). Bark is a two tone grey and white, tough, firm and fissured (2). Mauve scented flowers appear in spring and are followed by olive shaped fruit turning yellow when ripe. After leaf fall in autumn only bunches of yellow fruit will remain on the tree (3 & 4). Large compound leaf with bipinnate and tripinnate features can consist of more than seventy small leaflets up to 5 cm long with toothed or entire margins and mostly ovate in shape (5). (See Leaf Characteristics Page for information on terms used.) Notes: Fruit is poisonous to humans and livestock, but is eaten safely by a range of birds. Distribution: Along Australia's east coast north from the NSW south coast.

White Cedar Melia azedarach
White Cedar Bark
Melia azedarach Flower
White Cedar Fruit
Melia azedarach Leaf
White Cedar
White Cedar Bark
Melia azedarach Flower
White Cedar Fruit
White Cedar Leaf
         
White Elderberry Sambucus gaudichaudiana
The White Elderberry Sambucus gaudichaudiana is a sprawling native shrub propagating from underground rootstock with emerging shoots reaching a height of up to 3m. It naturally occurs on margins of rainforests and adjacent tall forests, on stream banks and is often found in disturbed areas and in regrowth (Image 1). Bark is firm in texture with scattered small corky blisters and a greyish brown in colour (2). Masses of pure white and scented flowers are borne on umbrella shaped panicles and bloom over spring (3). The globose shaped fruit is; a berry measuring up to 5 mm in diameter, purple in colour when ripe and contains up to 6 small and hard seeds surrounded by a yellow pulp (4). Pinnate or partly bi-pinnate (lowest leaflets) compound leaves with an opposite arrangement feature up to 11 separate leaflets which are; up to 14 cm in length with finely toothed margins, ovate or broadly lanceolate in shape, mid-green and rather dull on top, paler beneath, covered in short stiff hair, thin and soft in texture. Leaflet apex is acute to acuminate, base shape is cuneate to nearly rounded and often slightly asymmetric. Venation is clearly visible on both surfaces (5). Distribution: Widespread in VIC, NSW and QLD. Note: Additional features in identification are small leaflets sometimes found at the base of opposing leaves (not shown).
See Flower Characteristics Page and Leaf Characteristics Page for information on terms used.

White Elderberry Sambucus gaudichaudiana
Sambucus gaudichaudiana Bark White Elderberry
White Elderberry Flower Sambucus gaudichaudiana
White Elderberry Fruit Sambucus gaudichaudiana
White Elderberry Leaf Sambucus gaudichaudiana
White Elderberry
Sambucus gaudichaudiana Bark
White Elderberry Flower
White Elderberry Fruit
White Elderberry Leaf
         
White Euodia Melicope micrococca Other names: Hairy Doughwood
The White Euodia or Hairy Doughwood Melicope micrococca is a medium sized native tree species attaining up to 25 m in height with a straight trunk and is found on margins of different rainforests or as a pioneer species in regrowth areas (Image 1). Bark is a light grey colour and hard to the touch with horizontal fissures at the base of the trunk (2). Small white to cream coloured flowers a held in large panicles and blossom over summer (3). The small brownish fruit with yellow petals ripens in late summer to autumn and contains up to 4 black seeds (4). The trifoliate compound leaf with an opposite arrangement consists of 3 leaflets which are; obovate to elliptic in shape, up to 15 cm in length with mostly entire margins, softly hairy on their underside, sparsely hairy on the upper surface with denser hair on mid vein and firm in texture (5). Distribution: Mid-north coast of NSW to central QLD. See also Pink Doughwoood Melicope elleryana (Page 8) and Doughwood Acronychia octrandra (Page 3).

White Euodia Melicope micrococca Hairy Doughwood
Hairy Doughwood Bark
White Euodia Melicope micrococca Flower
White Euodia Fruit Melicope micrococca
Melicope micrococca Hairy Doughwood Leaf
White Euodia
Hairy Doughwood Bark
White Euodia Flower
Melicope micrococca Fruit
Melicope micrococca Leaf
         
White Hollywood Auranticarpa rhombifolia [Pittosporum rhombifolia] Other names: Holly-leaved Pittosporum, White Holly, Queensland Pittosporum and Diamond-leaved Pittosporum
The White Holly Auranticarpa rhombifolia is known by a range of common names mainly due to its popularity as a street tree and an ornamental species. Under good conditions it can reach a height of 20m and is naturally found in subtropical and drier types of rainforests (Image 1). Bark is a whitish grey in colour with rough and firm texture (2). Pure white flowers measuring up to 15mm in diameter each are held in large panicles and cover the whole tree in spring. Flowers feature five petals and are pleasantly scented (3). Masses of orange fruit ripens in autumn and splits to reveal 1 or 2 shiny black seeds (4). Simple new leaves are arranged in a whorl formation and turn alternate when maturing. They are; characteristically diamond shaped, up to 12 cm long with irregular toothed margins towards the apex, hairless, smooth and quite firm in texture. Apex is short acuminate, base shape is cuneate to attenuate. Mid vein is raised on lower surface and fine venation is apparent when the leaf held against the light (5). Distribution: Naturally occurring from northern NSW to tropical QLD.

White Hollywood Auranticarpa rhombifolia
White Holly Bark Auranticarpa rhombifolia
Auranticarpa rhombifolia Flower White Hollywood
Auranticarpa rhombifolia Fruit White Hollywood
White Hollywood Leaves Auranticarpa rhombifolia
White Hollywood
White Hollywood Bark
Auranticarpa rhombifolia
Auranticarpa rhombifolia Fruit
White Hollywood Leaves
         
White Laceflower Tree Archidendron hendersonii
This interesting native tree is found in subtropical and littoral rainforests as an understorey species less than 15m in height (Image 1). Bark on older specimens is a greyish brown in colour with a rather rough and flaky texture. Juvenile bark is firm with shallow fissures (2). Masses of gorgeous but short-lived flowers bloom in early spring turning from white to yellow over a short period of time and measure up to 6 cm in length (3). Unusual bipinnate compound leaves consisting of only two (sometimes 4) pinnae with 4 to 6 leaflets each which are; up to 12 cm in length with entire margins, lanceolate in shape, dark green and glossy on top, paler and dull below, hairless with a soft and smooth but strong (thin leathery) texture. Apex is acute with a fine point featuring a minute bristle; base shape is a very good identification characteristic by being very asymmetric. The petiole is up to 5 cm in length and features a small gland about half way (4). Venation is clearly visible with mid vein being raised (Images 4 & 5). Distribution: NSW north-coast to southern QLD.

White Laceflower Tree Archidendron hendersonii
White Laceflower Tree Bark Archidendron hendersonii
Archidendron hendersonii Flower White Laceflower Tree
White Laceflower Tree Leaves Archidendron hendersonii
White Laceflower Tree Leaflets Archidendron hendersonii
White Laceflower Tree
White Laceflower Bark
Archidendron hendersonii Flower
White Laceflower Leaf
White Laceflower Leaflets
         
White's Tea-Tree Leptospermum whitei
The White's Tea-Tree is a sturdy, often multi-stemmed shrub reaching up to 5m in height (under ideal conditions), its preferred habitat are margins of coastal swamp forests and tidal waterways (Pictures 1 & 2). Young bark is mid-brown in colour turning grey with age and has a rough fibrous texture where old bark is shedding in papery short strips (3). Flowers appear in tight clusters over spring to early summer featuring 5 bright white and obovate shaped petals characteristic for the Leptospermum genus. They measure up to 12 mm in diameter when fully opened (4). Young green stems are covered in short fine hair. Simple leaves with an alternate arrangement are; up to 3 cm in length, elliptic in shape with entire margins, hairless, dark green, rather dull on top, thick with a stiff texture. Venation is obscure except for mid vein. Leaf apex is acute ending in a blunt point, base shape is cuneate. The petiole is nearly non existent at 1 -2 mm in length (5). Distribution: From the mid north coast of NSW to QLD. Note: The species is named after Cyril Tenison White (1890-1950), botanist. See Flower Identification and Leaf Characteristics Page for information on terms used.

White's Tea-Tree Leptospermum whitei
White's Tea-Tree Stems Leptospermum whitei
White's Tea-Tree Bark Leptospermum whitei
White's Tea-Tree Flower Leptospermum whitei
White's Tea-Tree Leaves Leptospermum whitei
White's Tea-Tree
White's Tea-Tree Stems
White's Tea-Tree Bark
Leptospermum whitei Flower
White's Tea-Tree Leaves
         
Wild Parsley Lomatia silaifolia Other names: Crinkle Bush, Fern-leaved Lomatia, Parsley Bush
Wild Parsley or Crinkle Bush is a small native shrub growing to height of to 2.5m with a compact growing habit and dense foliage (Image 1). Bark is reddish brown in colour showing fine longitudinal fissures (2). Beautiful white flowers up to 30 held on a long spike are blooming over winter on the NSW mid-north coast (3).Fruit is a flattened pod (follicle) up to 4 cm in length, dark brown to black in colour containing numerous seeds enclosed in a papery wing up to 20mm long (4). Alternately arranged pinnate compound leaves feature between 7 and 11 leaflets which are; between 5 to 8 cm long with deeply lobed (up to 5 lobes) and toothed or just irregular toothed margins, elliptic to lanceolate in shape, mostly hairless and thin but firm in texture. Leaf apex can be acute with a blunt point or rounded. Leaves are pretty dull mid-green in colour and scented reminiscent of parsley when crushed (5). Distribution: NSW central coast to southern QLD.

Wild Parsley Lomatia silaifolia
Wild Parsley Bark Lomatia silaifolia
Lomatia silaifolia Flower Wild Parsley
Wild Parsley Fruit Lomatia silaifolia
Lomatia silaifolia Leaves Wild Parsley
Wild Parsley
Wild Parsley
Lomatia silaifolia Flower
Wild Parsley Fruit
Wild Parsley Leaves
         
Willow-leaved Hakea Hakea saliciifolia
Under favourable conditions the Willow-leaved Hakea Hakea saliciifolia can reach a height of up to 15m with a sparse canopy and rather obvious dehiscent fruit of prior seasons remaining on older branches. It is found on margins of rainforests and in wet sclerophyll forests (Image 1). Bark is a reddish brown (especially new exposed bark) in colour with rough and flaky texture (2). Very hard woody fruits are up to 2.5 cm in length with irregular warts and bumps containing 2 papery winged seeds per follicle only (3). New growth flushes in salmon colours and is finely hairy (4). Mature simple leaves with an alternate arrangement are: narrow elliptic to narrow lanceolate in shape, up to 12 cm in length with entire margins, hairless, mid green and rather dull, slightly paler beneath, smooth, firm to stiff in texture. Apex is acute, base shape is attenuate. Venation is faint with laterals veins just visible (5). Distribution: Mountainous areas from NSW mid-north coast to QLD border.

Willow-leaved Hakea Hakea saliciifolia
Hakea saliciifolia Bark Willow-leaved Hakea
Willow-leaved Hakea Fruit Hakea saliciifolia
Hakea saliciifolia Willow-leaved Hakea
Willow-leaved Hakea Leaves Hakea saliciifolia
Willow-leaved Hakea
Hakea saliciifolia Bark
Willow-leaved Hakea Fruit
Hakea saliciifolia
Willow-leaved Hakea Leaves
         
Wing-leaved Tulip Harpullia allata
This understorey shrub or sometimes small tree prefers a mountainous habitat within subtropical rainforests where it can reach a height of up to 5 -6 m. The distinctive foliage consisting of large compound leaves with a winged leaf stalk and rachis make this species relatively easy to identify (Image 1). Bark on older stems is finely rough in texture due to small blisters and fine ridges covering the surface. Colour is a reddish brown, if not obscured by mosses and lichen (2). Globe-shaped flower buds are hairy on the outside and appear sparsely along racemes measuring between 5 and 12 cm in length. The image also shows a pollinated flower where the 5 rounded sepals persist, but petals and stamens have fallen (3). The fruit is a capsule with 2 distinctive lobes measuring up to 3.5 cm in width and up to 2 cm in length. It changes from green to a yellowish brown colour with full maturity (4). Large pinnate compound leaves can reach close to 40 cm in length with up to 10 leaflets, which are; up to 15 cm in length with prominently toothed margins, varied in shape from elliptic or oblong to oblanceolate, glossy, dark green, mostly hairless, strong and slightly leathery in texture. The rachis (center axis) and petiole (leaf stalk) reaching up to 10 cm in length feature a wing with toothed margins. Venation is clearly visible and prominently raised on lower leaflet surface. Distribution: From NSW north coast to southern Qld.

Wing-leaved Tulip Harpullia alata
Wing-leaved Tulip Bark Harpullia alata
Wing-leaved Tulip Harpullia alata Flower
Wing-leaved Tulip Harpullia alata Fruit
Wing-leaved Tulip Leaf Harpullia alata
Wing-leaved Tulip
Wing-leaved Tulip Bark
Harpullia alata
Wing-leaved Tulip Fruit
Wing-leaved Tulip Leaf
         
Woolly Brush Apple Mischocarpus lachnocarpus Other names: Woolly Pear-fruit
The Woolly Brush Apple or Woolly Pear-fruit Mischocarpus lachnocarpus is a small tree species found within mountainous rainforest areas (Image 1). Bark is rather smooth and a dark green grey in colour (2). New foliage appearing in spring is a bright yellow green (3). Small yellow flowers 3 to 5 mm long held on a raceme up to 25 cm in length develop into an orange, hairy pear shaped fruit (4). Compound leaves alternately arranged feature 2 leaflets which are; mostly elliptic in shape with entire margins, up to 14 cm long, firm and stiff in texture. Lower leaf surface, petiole and young stems are all covered in fine brown hair. Rounded or blunt pointed leaf apex has a small notch with a tiny bristle. Venation is clearly visible with a strongly raised mid vein covered in hair (4 & 5). Distribution: Northern NSW to southern Qld.

Woolly Brush Apple Mischocarpus lachnocarpus Woolly Pear-fruit
Woolly Brush Apple Bark Mischocarpus lachnocarpus Woolly Pear-fruit
Woolly Pear-fruit Mischocarpus lachnocarpus Woolly Brush Apple
Woolly Brush Apple Flower Mischocarpus lachnocarpus
Woolly Brush Apple Leaves Mischocarpus lachnocarpus
Woolly Brush Apple
Woolly Brush Apple Bark
Woolly Pear-fruit
Mischocarpus lachnocarpus Flower
Woolly Brush Apple Leaves
         
Yellow Aspen Sarcomelicope simplicifolia Other names: Yellow Acronychia
Yellow Aspen also known as Yellow Acronychia can attain a height of up to 25 m under favourable conditions in subtropical and littoral rainforests (Image 1). Bark is dark grey in colour with a rough and fissured texture (2). Dark green, glossy foliage with a lighter underside featuring simple (1-Foliate) leaves (3). Broad elliptic to oblong shaped leaves are up to 18 cm long with entire margins and an opposite arrangement. Petiole is whitish in colour, thin and slender and can be more than 5 cm long. Fruit is a yellow to light brown colour and measures up to 15 mm across (4 & 5). Distribution: NSW south coast to central QLD.

Yellow Aspen Sarcomelicope simplicifolia
Yellow Aspen Bark
Sarcomelicope simplicifolia Yellow Aspen
Yellow Acronychia Fruit Sacromelicope simplicifolia
Sarcomelicope simplicifolia Leaves
Yellow Aspen
Yellow Aspen Bark
Sarcomelicope simplicifolia
Yellow Acronychia Fruit
Sarcomelicope simplicifolia
Yellow Carabeen Sloanea woollsii
This majestic large tree species can grow to more than 50 m in height within subtropical rainforests and has been extensively logged for its valueable timber . The specimen shown in picture 1 is being overtaken by a strangler fig (Ficus watkinsiana) (Images 1 & 2). Older trees develop large buttress roots (3). Fruit is a spiky capsule containing one or two seeds with a yellow or reddish aril (4). Simple (1-foliolate) leaves are up to 16 cm long and elliptic to lanceolate in shape with toothed margins. Young shoots and petioles are covered in fine hair (5). Distribution: from the mid-north coast of NSW to southern Qld.

Yellow Carabeen Tree Sloanea woollsii
Sloanea woollsii Yellow Carabeeen Tree
Yellow Carabeen Buttress
Sloanea woollsii Fruit Yellow Carabeen
Yellow carabeen Leaves
Yellow Carabeen Tree
Sloanea woollsii
Yellow Carabeen Buttress
Sloanea woollsii Fruit
Yellow Carabeen Leaves
         
Yellow Laurel Cryptocarya bidwillii
The Yellow Laurel Cryptocarya bidwillii is a medium sized native rainforest species which under favourable conditions reaches a height of 20m and features a bright green foliage (Image 1). Horizontal branches extending from the trunk hold a very dense canopy (2). Bark is grey to light brown in colour, hard and slightly rough with small longitudinal fissures (3). Emerging flower buds (4). Simple leaves with an alternate arrangement are: up to 12 cm long with wavy margins, elliptic to broad lanceolate in shape, hairless with a firm and leathery texture and emit a strong spicy (camphor like) scent when crushed. Venation is pronounced, mid vein and up to 6 pairs of lateral veins are raised and colored yellow on lower leaf surface (5). Distribution: NSW north coast to central QLD.

Yellow Laurel Cryptocarya bidwillii
Cryptocarya bidwillii Yellow Laurel
Yellow Laurel  Bark Cryptocarya bidwillii
Yellow Laurel Flower Bud Cryptocarya bidwillii
Yellow Laurel Leaves Cryptocarya bidwillii
Yellow Laurel
Cryptocarya bidwillii
Yellow Laurel Bark
Yellow Laurel Flower Bud
Yellow Laurel Leaves
         
Yellow Plumwood Pouteria myrsinifolia Other names Blunt-leaved Coondoo
The Yellow Plumwood or Blunt-leaved Coondoo Pouteria myrsinifolia is a small native tree species growing to a height of up to 15m and occurs in different types of rainforests (Image 1). Bark is brown in colour with a rough and grainy texture featuring numerous fine longitudinal ridges (2). Cylindrical shaped flower held on individual stalks are a yellowish green in colour and measure only up to 3mm across and 7mm in length (3). Young stems, flower stalks and petioles are covered in very fine and short hair. Developing fruit is shown to the bottom right in the image (4). Simple neatly alternately arranged (two-ranked) leaves are; up to 10 cm long with entire margins, elliptic to oblanceolate in shape, dark green with a satin sheen on top, paler underneath, medium thick, strong, nearly leathery and on this specimen mostly hairless. Apex is bluntly pointed, leaf base shape is attenuate. Mid vein is raised on lower surface and hairy at the base, otherwise venation is rather faint (5). Distribution: NSW central coast to southern QLD.

Yellow Plumwood Pouteria myrsinifolia
Yellow Plumwood Bark Pouteria myrsinifolia
Blunt-leaved Coondoo Flower Pouteria myrsinifolia
Pouteria myrsinifolia Flower and Fruit Yellow Plumwood
Yellow Plumwood Leaves Pouteria myrsinifolia
Yellow Plumwood
Yellow Plumwood Bark
Blunt-leaved Coondoo Flower
Pouteria myrsinifolia
Yellow Plumwood Leaves
         
Yellow Satinheart Bosistoa transversa
Elegant small tree species found in STRf from northern NSW to central QLD (Image 1). Bark features small longitudinal fissures and blisters (2). New growth flushes in pink to salmon tones (3). Compound leaves consist of two to three leaflets. Leaflets are up to 14 cm in length with entire margins, shape is elliptic to oblanceolate
(4 & 5).
Yellow Satinheart Bosistoa transversa
Yellow Satinheart Bark
Bosistoa transversa Yellow Satinheart
Bosistoa transversa Leaf
Yellow Satinheart Leaflets
Yellow Satinheart
Yellow Satinheart Bark
Bosistoa transversa
Bosistoa transversa Leaf
Yellow Satinheart Leaflets
         
We attempt to properly describe any tree species shown on this web page and cross referenced images using these Resources. It is recommended to cross reference your plant material or photographs with the resource list provided when identifying tree species. A personal interest into our native forest species for more than twenty years provided the images, descriptions and measurements for any tree species shown. Other experience was gathered through a long time involvement with Landcare River Restoration Projects and Farm Foresters. Information on distribution range of tree species has been collected using a selection of sources (see link above). The target of these web pages is to show the diversity and magnificence of our remaining rainforests areas. Our aim is to build up the awareness to the high conservation values these subtropical and tropical rainforest areas deserve.
Please note all images are copyright, watermarked and not to be used without prior permission by All Creative Designs® worldwide rights reserved.

 Tree Pages:   1   A - Bl  |     2   Bo - Br  |     3   C - D  |     4   E - Euca  |     5   F - Figs  |     6   F - G  |     7   H - M  |     8   N - P  |     9   R - Si  |     10   Sm - Syz  |     11   T - V  |     12   W - Z    

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